Secondary & Tertiary Motions

In addition to the primary motions of shedding, picking, and beating, there are several secondary & tertiary motions that occur during the weaving process. These motions help to ensure that the fabric being woven is of high quality and that the loom operates smoothly.

Secondary motions of a loom include:

1. Let-off Motion: This motion ensures that the warp yarn is fed to the loom at a constant rate. The let-off motion is typically accomplished by using a warp beam and a friction brake system to control the tension on the warp yarn as it is woven.

2. Take-up Motion: This motion controls the speed at which the woven fabric is wound onto the cloth beam. The take-up motion is typically accomplished by using a cloth beam and a friction brake system to control the tension on the fabric as it is wound onto the beam.

Tertiary motion or Stop motions

  • Warp Stop Motion: This motion stops the loom when a warp yarn breaks or runs out. The warp stop motion is typically accomplished by using sensors or other devices that detect the presence of the warp yarn and trigger an automatic stop if the yarn is missing.
  • Weft Stop Motion: This motion stops the loom when a weft yarn breaks or runs out. The weft stop motion is typically accomplished by using sensors or other devices that detect the presence of the weft yarn and trigger an automatic stop if the yarn is missing.
  • Warp protector motion: This motion protect the warp threads by stopping the loom when the shuttle fails to reach, the selvedge side and box properly into either the shuttle box during picking.
  • Temple Motion: This motion helps to prevent the fabric from shrinking or distorting during the weaving process. The temple is a device that holds the woven fabric taut as it is woven, preventing it from contracting or distorting due to the tension on the warp yarn.

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